PhotobucketCongrats to winner Susan!  You’ll have a lot of fun reading this one.  Sometimes memoirs are stranger than fiction.  Maybe that’s why I love them so much–the knowledge that the stuff you’re reading actually happened.  So is the case with Walking Through Walls by Philip Smith.  Probably the most unusual memoir I’ve ever read, Walking Through Walls takes you through Smith’s life growing up with a father who is an interior designer with powerful psychic abilities.  Smith’s father becomes more and more dedicated to learning about his gift, and while he uses his gifts to help and heal, his bizarre lifestyle sometimes gets the better of Philip.  After all, when your father’s a psychic it’s hard to get away with much.

Philip Smith’s writing style is nothing short of absorbing.  His ability to put his life into a smoothly flowing, engaging novel format makes this a fascinating read no matter what your beliefs on psychics and the paranormal.  The dialog is well written and convincing, and Smith holds nothing back–good or bad–when talking about his family.  These are just a few reasons this book gets the Goldfish Award.  The rest of the reasons?  Unless you’re psychic, you’ll have to read the book to find out.  

Here’s your chance to win a copy of Walking Through Walls.

3 Ways to Win:

1.) Leave a comment telling me what you think of the supernatural.  Do you believe in miracles?  Psychics? Aliens?  Be thoughtful with your comment! Winners are randomly chosen, but if the name drawn doesn’t respond, I choose the next winner by comment.

2.) Email subscribers are entered into this and all future giveaways, for as long as their subscription is active. Simply place your email address in the little white box at the top of my sidebar on the right. (Please make sure to verify your Feedburner subscription by responding to the email they send you. If you don’t receive it, check your junk mail. Only verified subscriptions are entered for all the giveaways.)

3.) Blog about this giveaway on your blog with a link back to this post. Come back and leave me a Comment with a link to your blog post.

Do all three, and you’ve got three entries to win! You have until midnight EST on Sunday, October 12, 2008, to enter.

Congratulations to Rebekah, the winner of The Front Porch Prophet.  

A.J. has just discovered his best friend is deathly ill, so he decides it’s time they got over their rift and made amends.  But Eugene is no simple friend.  His dying requests are killers.  What A.J. has to face is more than just sorting through their friendship’s past.  He also has some big decisions to make, and it’s time to see how far he’ll go for friendship.

Set in the mountains of Georgia, The Front Porch Prophet gives the reader a look at quirky small town life.  Amidst humorous dialogue and unusual townsfolk, Atkins weaves a tale that will have the reader hard-pressed to set the book down. The Front Porch Prophet is a touching and clever novel that looks at life, death, and friendship with a warm Southern slant.  If you like John Nichols (The Milagro Beanfield War), you’re gonna love Raymond L. Atkin’s new novel.  This book does all the things a good novel should do:  It inspires, brings on the tears, makes you laugh out loud.  That’s why The Front Porch Prophet gets the Goldfish Award.  And that’s why I’m so pleased to tell you I have an extra autographed copy to give away.  

If you don’t win, do yourself a favor and go buy a copy of The Front Porch Prophet.  This is the kind of novel to read when the autumn weather is moving in and you just want to curl up in your favorite spot with an absorbing book.  

3 Ways to Win:

1.) Leave a comment telling me what you’ve done for a friend or what they’ve done for you.  Did it change you?  Did it change your friendship?  Be thoughtful with your comment! Winners are randomly chosen, but if the name drawn doesn’t respond, I choose the next winner by comment.

2.) Email subscribers are entered into this and all future giveaways, for as long as their subscription is active. Simply place your email address in the little white box at the top of my sidebar on the right. (Please make sure to verify your Feedburner subscription by responding to the email they send you. If you don’t receive it, check your junk mail. Only verified subscriptions are entered for all the giveaways.)

3.) Blog about this giveaway on your blog with a link back to this post. Come back and leave me a Comment with a link to your blog post.

Do all three, and you’ve got three entries to win! You have until midnight EST on Monday, October 6, 2008, to enter.

I don’t believe I’ve reviewed any self-help book at carp(e) libris reviews yet.  But the opportunity came up recently to review one, and its focus on helping people who have been the target of discrimination is certainly something that could help many of us.  Withstanding the Lie by father and daughter team Roger and Nicole Brewer is literally healing between the covers of a book.  If you’ve ever experienced any sort of discrimination, whether it’s due to your race, religion, sex, size, physical ability, etc., and if that discrimination hurt you, made you hate, or somehow affected you so that you are unable to heal and move beyond it, then you’ll want to get a copy of Withstanding the Lie.

Both of the Brewers have experienced discrimination in their lives, but neither are bitter or hateful.  They’ve learned how to move beyond the pain the incidents caused, and now they’re passing on their knowledge to others.  I found the information insightful and sensitive.  In fact, while reading the book I came up against a problem wherein I was able to apply something I was learning from the book.  I was able to avert a situation that could have easily mushroomed into a hurtful experience for both me and the other person involved.  While the Brewers are quick to let you know that fixing the hurt takes time, there is much to be learned from Withstanding the Lie that a reader will be able to apply to their life immediately.

Want to win your own copy?  I have an extra right here.

3 Ways to Win:

1.) Leave a comment telling me if you’ve ever been discriminated against.  How did it hurt you and did you try to do something to get over it? (There’s no need to tell us why you were discriminated against if you don’t want to.) Be thoughtful with your comment! Winners are randomly chosen, but if the name drawn doesn’t respond, I choose the next winner by comment.

2.) Email subscribers are entered into this and all future giveaways, for as long as their subscription is active. Simply place your email address in the little white box at the top of my sidebar on the right. (Please make sure to verify your Feedburner subscription by responding to the email they send you. If you don’t receive it, check your junk mail. Only verified subscriptions are entered for all the giveaways.)

3.) Blog about this giveaway on your blog with a link back to this post. Come back and leave me a Comment with a link to your blog post.

Do all three, and you’ve got three entries to win! You have until midnight EST on Thursday, October 2, 2008, to enter.

Check out the Withstanding the Lie website too.

Silent Girl brilliantly takes the short story and adds a Shakespearian twist. Each short, written by Tricia Dower, is based on a work of Shakespeare; but if you’re not well versed in this most famous of writers, you’ll not miss out on enjoying some talented writing. If you do enjoy Shakespeare, then you’re in for a special treat when you pick up Silent Girl. Each story is written with plays such as The Tempest and Hamlet in mind, but it’s done in a subtle manner and in an entirely different setting than the play upon which the story is based. For instance, imagine a sort of Taming of the Shrew set in Kyrgyzstan. Or Twelfth Night set in Minnesota. Shakespeare fans will enjoy searching for the similarities, but those who’ve never studied his work will simply enjoy short stories that are sometimes heartbreaking, sometimes humorous, but always well executed.

For the book club, Silent Girl is a perfect choice due to its many layers. In fact, the book comes with a study guide to help book clubs along, whether or not they’re Shakespeare readers. If you’d like to read Silent Girl for yourself, I have one autographed copy. So grab your reading group and enter here for your own copy.

3 Ways to Win:

1.) Leave a comment telling me if you’ve read Shakespeare. What did you think? Have fun with your comment! Winners are randomly chosen, but if the name drawn doesn’t respond, I choose the next winner by comment.

2.) Email subscribers are entered into this and all future giveaways, for as long as their subscription is active. Simply place your email address in the little white box at the top of my sidebar on the right. (Please make sure to verify your Feedburner subscription by responding to the email they send you. If you don’t receive it, check your junk mail. Only verified subscriptions are entered for all the giveaways.)

3.) Blog about this giveaway on your blog with a link back to this post. Come back and leave me a Comment with a link to your blog post.

Do all three, and you’ve got three entries to win! You have until midnight EST on Sunday, September 28, 2008, to enter.

Published by Inanna Publications.


Every parent faces it at some point or another – empty nest syndrome. In Liam’s Going, Cathleen and Noah prepare to start this new and unfamiliar stage of their lives after their son Liam leaves for college. As Cathleen drives with her son to drop him off at college and Noah stays behind to give mother and son much-needed alone time, each of them flash back to the defining moments of their lives, both together and apart.

Author Michael Joyce has a sensitivity to language that brings an almost poetic feel, quite appropriate for a story whose protagonist Cathleen is a poet herself. Join that with realistic character building, wonderful dialogue, and a touching plot, you’ll find you have a book that’s both a pleasure and a heartbreak to absorb.

McPherson & Company is giving away one copy of Liam’s Going to a carp(e) libris reviews reader, so if you’re in the mood for a good read, enter to win!

3 Ways to Win:

1.) Leave a comment telling me if you’re an empty nester; or were you the one who left the nest? What do you remember about that? Have fun with your comment! Winners are randomly chosen, but if the name drawn doesn’t respond, I choose the next winner by comment.

2.) Email subscribers are entered into this and all future giveaways, for as long as their subscription is active. Simply place your email address in the little white box at the top of my sidebar on the right. (Please make sure to verify your Feedburner subscription by responding to the email they send you. If you don’t receive it, check your junk mail. Only verified subscriptions are entered for all the giveaways.)

3.) Blog about this giveaway on your blog with a link back to this post. Come back and leave me a Comment with a link to your blog post.

Do all three, and you’ve got three entries to win! You have until midnight EST on Monday, September 22, 2008, to enter.


You may remember when not too long ago I reviewed a book of short short stories published by Rose Metal Press. I discovered I loved the short short story form, and thankfully that book wasn’t the only of this sort Rose Metal chose to publish. Their latest, In the Land of the Free, written by Geoffrey Forsyth, is another fascinating example of why I feel short shorts should get more exposure. Forsyth’s stories, most lasting no more than three or four pages, are packed with raw human emotion. From humor to ache, love to death, these stories are concentrated forms of literature that bear reading over and over.

Forsyth’s stories are most original; I’m sure it’s a large part of the reason he won the Rose Metal Press Second Annual Short Short Chapbook Contest. His stories feature young people – a baby born in the kitchen, a man who in his youth purchases a wall out of his naivete, a young man who wakes to find his dead relatives in his living room. These addictive little bits will most certainly get you hooked on short shorts.

If you’ve not read a short short story before, I highly recommend you try it. We all need something artistic and deep in our lives, and let’s face it – most people skip it completely, never realizing it’s missing. But for us readerly types, it’s a necessity that we recognize. Think of short shorts as multivitamins for the brain and the soul. Or a pick-me-up more handy than a cup of coffee, healthier than a cigarette break. If you decide to start with In the Land of the Free, you’ll have yourself a most creatively published work as well. This chapbook has an old-style letterpress cover which was produced at the Museum of Printing in Andover, Massachusetts–the perfect format for In the Land of the Free. I ask you, when was the last time you heard of a mainstream press take such care with their book printing? Another reason to love the Indie presses.

Want to win your own copy of In the Land of the Free? Here’s your chance.

3 Ways to Win:

1.) Leave a comment telling me what interests you about reading short short stories.  Have you read them before?  Why would you like to try? Have fun with your comment! Winners are randomly chosen, but if the name drawn doesn’t respond, I choose the next winner by comment.

2.) Email subscribers are entered into this and all future giveaways, for as long as their subscription is active. Simply place your email address in the little white box at the top of my sidebar on the right. (Please make sure to verify your Feedburner subscription by responding to the email they send you. If you don’t receive it, check your junk mail. Only verified subscriptions are entered for all the giveaways.)

3.) Blog about this giveaway on your blog with a link back to this post. Come back and leave me a Comment with a link to your blog post.

Do all three, and you’ve got three entries to win! You have until midnight EST on Thursday, September 18, 2008, to enter.


Are you ready for the next blockbuster novel to hit the bookshelves? I do believe I’ve got it sitting right here. The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo snagged my attention immediately. Not only is it an intense mystery with a depth of plot being compared to War and Peace (don’t worry – you won’t get lost in anything but fascination), this amazing book was originally written in Swedish. If you’ve spent much time at all on this blog, then you know I’m a sucker for foreign works. If you’re not one to pick up a translated book, Stieg Larsson is about to make a convert out of you.

In The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo you’ve got a work that will rival any powerful thriller or mystery seen in recent years, if not longer. In fact, Larsson’s first novel has outsold The DaVinci Code and Harry Potter in France, and the entire trilogy (Millennium Trilogy) has been selling fast and furious throughout Europe. Its complex plot will have the most die-hard mystery fans scratching their heads, unable to outwit the author.

In the book, protagonist Mikael Blomkvist, a journalist who’s recently been to jail for slander, finds himself with an offer to solve a wealthy family’s mystery – one of their own went missing over 30 years ago, and one family member is bound and determined to figure it out if it takes the last of his days. The biggest problem? Most of the suspects are members of his own twisted family. Blomkvist, with the help of social outcast Lisbeth Salander, take on the challenge in the hope of finding his own revenge in the process. What proceeds on the upcoming pages is a series of plot twists, turns, and unexpected stomach-droppers that will certainly see this book straight to the top of the Bestseller lists.

Just as fascinating is author Stieg Larsson himself. His own life sounds more like another thriller novel. Having worked for over 30 years fighting fascism and racial and religious intolerance through his journalistic work. He’s been quite a hero in his native Sweden, and across Europe as well. But shortly after presenting his trilogy of novels to his editor at the age of 50, Larsson unexpectedly died. Some call his death its own mystery due to the nature of his journalistic work. After all, he’d built up quite a list of dangerous enemies over the years. But close friends insist that Larsson’s 60-cigarette-a-day habit, along with his obsessively long work hours, certainly didn’t do anything positive for his health. Either way, a great crime writer was lost before his readers got a chance to discover him. The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo wasn’t even published in time for him to see it.

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (published in Sweden under the name “Män Som Hatar Kvinnor”) will be out in hardcover in America for the first time, debuting on September 16th, 2008, but I have an extra copy here for one very lucky carp(e) libris reviews reader. Enter to win by midnight, September 12, 2008, and the winner will receive the book on the big release date. How to win? Read on…

3 Ways to Win
:

1.) Leave a comment telling me about your mystery reading habits. Do you like mysteries and thrillers? What’s the best you’ve read lately? Have fun with your comment! Winners are randomly chosen, but if the name drawn doesn’t respond, I choose the next winner by comment.

2.) Email subscribers are entered into this and all future giveaways, for as long as their subscription is active. Simply place your email address in the little white box at the top of my sidebar on the right. (Please make sure to verify your Feedburner subscription by responding to the email they send you. If you don’t receive it, check your junk mail. Only verified subscriptions are entered for all the giveaways.)

3.) Blog about this giveaway on your blog with a link back to this post. Come back and leave me a Comment with a link to your blog post.

Do all three, and you’ve got three entries to win! You have until midnight EST on Friday, September 12, 2008, to enter.

What is a Goldfish Award?


I love reading and learning about Asian culture and its rich history. China certainly has no shortage of either! When you mix that with the genealogy of a family, you’ve got my interest. Growing up, I listened to my mother’s stories of our ancestors as she uncovered their secrets while studying our family tree. While there are no Chinese branches on mine, there is a wonderful Asian twist that has given me a lifelong fascination with the Orient. That’s why books like Sweet Mandarin always manage to grab me and hang on.

Sweet Mandarin is more than a true story. It is several true stories all woven into one amazing family history that is author Helen Tse’s. Starting with the story of her great grandparents, it works its way from generation to generation, giving a beautiful account of what makes her family unique. Helen Tse’s family history contains a long line of fascinating people who struggled to work their way out of difficult situations, regardless of what they were “supposed” to do. The story starts with a great grandfather who began his own soy sauce factory and the family that suffered the consequences of his success. The bulk of the focus is on the women in Tse’s family; strong, brave women who break the bonds of China’s traditions, all the while coveting their culture like a valuable pearl. Tse’s family boasts three generations of restaurant owners, all having stories that will inspire and entertain.

Sweet Mandarin is a book that will appeal to a very wide audience – men, women, even young adult. Will it ever appear on the silver screen? I wouldn’t be surprised, and I certainly hope to hear there’s a movie contract in the works. And I thought my family was fascinating…

Want to win your own copy of Sweet Mandarin?

3 Ways to Win:

1.) Leave a comment telling me a little something about your family history. (I promise I won’t tell.) Where are you from? Do you know your roots, or are they a secret? Have fun with your comment! Winners are randomly chosen, but if the name drawn doesn’t respond, I choose the next winner by comment.

2.) Email subscribers are entered into this and all future giveaways, for as long as their subscription is active. Simply place your email address in the little white box at the top of my sidebar on the right. (Please make sure to verify your Feedburner subscription by responding to the email they send you. If you don’t receive it, check your junk mail. Only verified subscriptions are entered for all the giveaways.)

3.) Blog about this giveaway on your blog with a link back to this post. Come back and leave me a Comment with a link to your blog post.

Do all three, and you’ve got three entries to win! You have until midnight EST on Friday, September 5, 2008, to enter.

Scan through the archives of carp(e) libris reviews and you’ll find quite a selection of poetry. As I learn more and more about poetry, and as we learn to have a deeper appreciation for it through reviews and giveaways, I’m refining my tastes in the craft a little more with each book. The Opposite of Clairvoyance holds something of a blend of strength of voice and gentleness of spirit that I keep finding myself drawn into. Gillian Wegener’s selection of poems in her new book (published by Sixteen Rivers Press) covers a multitude of subjects that keep continuity through Wegener’s unique voice and musical rhythm. I often wonder how poetry would sound when read aloud by the poet, and this book is no exception.

Whether you’re a nature lover, someone who gains solace from reading heartbreak, or a mom in love with her kids, you’ll find something to relate to in The Opposite of Clairvoyance. But don’t make the mistake of thinking this poetry is cotton candy and tulips. There is a power to the voice as well as an edge, and many of the poems have an undercurrent of longing or reveal a disappointment in life. Regardless of the topic, each one ends leaving the reader to pause and reflect. For me, this is one of the main reasons to read a poem – reflection, either on the positive or negative aspects in life, and possibly the hope that the poet feels the same way we do, expressing it in ways we never thought to attempt.

To win your own autographed copy of The Opposite of Clairvoyance, read on.

3 Ways to Win:

1.) Leave a comment telling me what you look for when choosing poetry. Do you like something you can relate to? Easy to understand? Or do you like something more abstract? Have fun with your comment! Winners are randomly chosen, but if the name drawn doesn’t respond, I choose the next winner by comment.
2.) Email subscribers are entered into this and all future giveaways, for as long as their subscription is active. Simply place your email address in the little white box at the top of my sidebar on the right. (Please make sure to verify your Feedburner subscription by responding to the email they send you. If you don’t receive it, check your junk mail. Only verified subscriptions are entered for all the giveaways.)
3.) Blog about this giveaway on your blog with a link back to this post. Come back and leave me a Comment with a link to your blog post.
Do all three, and you’ve got three entries to win! You have until midnight EST on Monday, September 1, 2008, to enter.


I’ve been wanting to review books either written by Chinese authors or containing a Chinese setting, but until recently, I haven’t really seen many. Now I have a few waiting on my “to-be-reviewed” shelf; I suppose we can credit this interest to the Beijing Olympics. Lately we’ve all had a little glimpse into different aspects of Chinese life and culture. For me, The Painter from Shanghai has been more than a glimpse; it has been a riveting history lesson hidden between the pages of an amazing story.

Jennifer Cody Epstein took her fascination with the Chinese painter Pan Yuliang and turned it into a well-written, painstakingly researched story that gives us a vivid portrait of what this artist’s life may have been like. Although we don’t know a lot of detail about Pan Yuliang, we do know she was orphaned and sold into prostitution, and that she was rescued by a man who took a special interest in her. There are other skeletal details, but Epstein has filled in the picture to add flesh and muscle. Pan Yuliang and her early 1900’s China leaps to life and keeps every one of the over 400 pages burning with tales of art, Chinese culture, and one woman’s struggle to become the artist society says she has no right to be.

Having been to art school, I appreciated Epstein’s ability to comfortably write about art and the technical aspects of painting and drawing. As an avid reader, I was impressed with her knack for making these technical tidbits flow through a story, without dragging the reader through any dull sections. Everything flowed effortlessly in a way that will allow any reader to follow the pace set.

Want to win your own copy of The Painter from Shanghai? I’ve got your ticket to China via typeface, so leave me a comment and good luck!

3 Ways to Win:

1.) Leave a comment telling me if you know anything of Chinese art or culture. What interests you most about either? Have fun with your comment! Winners are randomly chosen, but if the name drawn doesn’t respond, I choose the next winner by comment.

2.) Email subscribers are entered into this and all future giveaways, for as long as their subscription is active. Simply place your email address in the little white box at the top of my sidebar on the right. (Please make sure to verify your Feedburner subscription by responding to the email they send you. If you don’t receive it, check your junk mail. Only verified subscriptions are entered for all the giveaways.)

3.) Blog about this giveaway on your blog with a link back to this post. Come back and leave me a Comment with a link to your blog post.

Do all three, and you’ve got three entries to win! You have until midnight EST on Friday, August 22, 2008, to enter.

Published by W.W. Norton & Company.